1. Take the test: June 27 is National HIV Testing Day →

    National HIV Testing Day Badge

    Today is National HIV Testing Day (NHTD). Did you know: 

    • Nearly 1.1 million people in the United States are living with HIV.
    • Of those, almost 20% don’t know it.
    • In 2008, that number was even higher among men who have sex with men (MSM)—44%.
    • Among young people, the number living with HIV who aren’t aware of it is a staggering 60%.

    Learn more about NHTD, the importance of HIV testing, and testing resources on our blog. 

  2. If you think you’ve been exposed to HIV, Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) may help prevent the spread of HIV up to 72 hours after exposure.

    Learn more and get people talking at PEP at TalkPEP.org.

    Learn more about the campaign

  3. We’ve redesigned our blog, the Fenway Focus. Check out the new look.

    We’ve redesigned our blog, the Fenway Focus. Check out the new look.

  4. Today is Give Out Day, a national giving event in support of nonprofits serving the LGBTQ community. Each donation is a chance for your favorite LGBTQ organization to win additional money. 
At Fenway, your donation helps us: 
Be the largest provider of out-patient HIV/AIDS care in New England
Care for nearly 800 transgender patients as part of our growing Trans Health program
Do ground-breaking research in LGBT health and HIV/AIDS at The Fenway Institute, home of the nation’s first community-based HIV research program and the first federally-funded research center to focus specifically on sexual minority population research.
Come out for LGBT health; give here. If you’re not able to contribute financially, why not donate a reblog, tweet, or post to help get the word out?

    Today is Give Out Day, a national giving event in support of nonprofits serving the LGBTQ community. Each donation is a chance for your favorite LGBTQ organization to win additional money. 

    At Fenway, your donation helps us: 

    • Be the largest provider of out-patient HIV/AIDS care in New England
    • Care for nearly 800 transgender patients as part of our growing Trans Health program
    • Do ground-breaking research in LGBT health and HIV/AIDS at The Fenway Institute, home of the nation’s first community-based HIV research program and the first federally-funded research center to focus specifically on sexual minority population research.

    Come out for LGBT health; give here. If you’re not able to contribute financially, why not donate a reblog, tweet, or post to help get the word out?

  5. National Women And Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day →

    March 10 is Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a nationwide observance to share knowledge and take action on the disease’s impact on women and girls.

  6. February 7, 2013 is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are among the hardest hit by HIV/AIDS but receive disproportionately little targeted funding and prevention and care services. Learn more here.

    You can also help raise awareness by sharing these infographics on Facebook.

    Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here

  7. National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and men who have sex with men (MSM) →

  8. Project ABLE’s annual Lobby Day for HIV/AIDS funding takes place this Thursday, January 24 at the Massachusetts State House from 10 a.m–1 p.m. Join us in asking legislators to restore critical HIV/AIDS funding to FY 2014 Massachusetts state budget. 
You can learn more about this important event on Project ABLE’s web site.

    Project ABLE’s annual Lobby Day for HIV/AIDS funding takes place this Thursday, January 24 at the Massachusetts State House from 10 a.m–1 p.m. Join us in asking legislators to restore critical HIV/AIDS funding to FY 2014 Massachusetts state budget. 

    You can learn more about this important event on Project ABLE’s web site.

  9. This photo, taken last week in Malawi, was sent to us by Stefan D. Baral at John Hopkins School of Public Health.
In December 2011, JHSPH and The Fenway Institute collaborated on trainings in Malawi to help address HIV/AIDS among men who have sex with men there. Learn more about those trainings here.
As Stefan notes in his email to us, “A billboard like this would have been truly unimaginable just five years ago.”

    This photo, taken last week in Malawi, was sent to us by Stefan D. Baral at John Hopkins School of Public Health.

    In December 2011, JHSPH and The Fenway Institute collaborated on trainings in Malawi to help address HIV/AIDS among men who have sex with men there. Learn more about those trainings here.

    As Stefan notes in his email to us, “A billboard like this would have been truly unimaginable just five years ago.”

  10. Fenway: More HIV Prevention Funding Needed for Gay Men →

    projectqueer:

    by The Rainbow Times

    New HIV infections held steady at about 50,000 in 2010, the CDC reported last month, but new infections among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are up 12% from 2008 to 2010. MSM represented 64% of new infections in 2010 compared with 61% in 2009, even though MSM comprise only 2% of the adult population. New infections were up 22% from 2008 to 2010 among MSM age 13 to 24.

    Despite the disproportionate burden of HIV among MSM, especially Black MSM, targeted HIV prevention is largely targeted toward heterosexuals and other risk groups, according to an analysis conducted by The Fenway Institute last year at the request of Funders Concerned About AIDS and amFAR.

    That analysis found that:

    • In a 2009 Wisconsin case study, among Blacks, male on male sex accounted for 58% of HIV diagnoses that year. Yet Black gay men only received 19% of targeted tests, and made up only 11% of HIV prevention clients.
    • Only 27% of HIV education and risk reduction funding was targeted toward MSM, according to a 2011 Centers for Disease Control analysis; 38% was targeted toward high-risk heterosexuals, while 20% was not targeted or was targeted toward other risk groups.
    • Only 16% of National Institutes of Health funding for HIV that was targeted to a specific risk group was allotted to MSM, according to a 2011 report by the White House Office of National AIDS Policy.

    “The HIV epidemic is increasingly impacting gay and bisexual men, especially Black men and young men, despite new advances in treatment and prevention,” said Kenneth Mayer, MD, Medical Research Director and Co-Chair of The Fenway Institute. “We must redouble our efforts to prevent HIV among gay men by shifting prevention funding to more closely match the incidence data.” 

    Many working in AIDS policy on the federal level are aware that prevention with MSM is underfunded and are working to change this.  Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of the CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention for the past seven years, recently acknowledged that funding for prevention and research with gay men was “about half of what it should be.” 

    “Our own stigma, our own homophobia,” Fenton said, “cascades down in our funding and allocations, intentionally or unintentionally resulting in underfunding of gay men’s work across the country.” (Source, The Georgia Voice, March 30, 2012.)

    The CDC recently launched new behavioral intervention programs aimed at Black gay men and transgender women. The CDC’s pro-HIV testing ads feature positive images of gay men of color. However, these don’t challenge the anti-gay prejudice that increases young gay men’s vulnerability to HIV and still discourages HIV testing in many communities. HIV is just one of many health disparities affecting gay youth. Many correlate with experiences of being bullied or socially isolated. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth are at greater risk than their heterosexual peers of violence and victimization, self-harm, substance abuse, sexually risky behavior and school absences because they feel unsafe. There are a number of resiliency factors linked to lower rates of risk behavior among LGBT youth.

    Click the header link above to read the full article.