1. Today is Give Out Day, a national giving event in support of nonprofits serving the LGBTQ community. Each donation is a chance for your favorite LGBTQ organization to win additional money. 
At Fenway, your donation helps us: 
Be the largest provider of out-patient HIV/AIDS care in New England
Care for nearly 800 transgender patients as part of our growing Trans Health program
Do ground-breaking research in LGBT health and HIV/AIDS at The Fenway Institute, home of the nation’s first community-based HIV research program and the first federally-funded research center to focus specifically on sexual minority population research.
Come out for LGBT health; give here. If you’re not able to contribute financially, why not donate a reblog, tweet, or post to help get the word out?

    Today is Give Out Day, a national giving event in support of nonprofits serving the LGBTQ community. Each donation is a chance for your favorite LGBTQ organization to win additional money. 

    At Fenway, your donation helps us: 

    • Be the largest provider of out-patient HIV/AIDS care in New England
    • Care for nearly 800 transgender patients as part of our growing Trans Health program
    • Do ground-breaking research in LGBT health and HIV/AIDS at The Fenway Institute, home of the nation’s first community-based HIV research program and the first federally-funded research center to focus specifically on sexual minority population research.

    Come out for LGBT health; give here. If you’re not able to contribute financially, why not donate a reblog, tweet, or post to help get the word out?

  2. This week is National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. The Violence Recovery Program at Fenway Health is highlighting the experiences of LGBTQ victims of violent crimes. 
Look for this Ad in Boston’s Metro this week.

61% of transgender people report being the victim of physical assault. 

    This week is National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. The Violence Recovery Program at Fenway Health is highlighting the experiences of LGBTQ victims of violent crimes. 

    Look for this Ad in Boston’s Metro this week.

    61% of transgender people report being the victim of physical assault. 

  3. Next week is National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. The Violence Recovery Program at Fenway Health is highlighting the experiences of LGBTQ victims of violent crimes. 
Look for this Ad in Boston’s Metro this week.

4 in 10 lesbian women, 6 in 10 bisexual women, 1 in 4 gay men, and 4 in 10 bisexual men have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner. Transgender survivors are almost twice as likely to experience sexual violence by an intimate partner than non-trans people.

    Next week is National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. The Violence Recovery Program at Fenway Health is highlighting the experiences of LGBTQ victims of violent crimes. 

    Look for this Ad in Boston’s Metro this week.

    4 in 10 lesbian women, 6 in 10 bisexual women, 1 in 4 gay men, and 4 in 10 bisexual men have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner. Transgender survivors are almost twice as likely to experience sexual violence by an intimate partner than non-trans people.

  4. Lesbian, bisexual, and queer women and transgender people experience disparities in cancer risk, screening, and treatment. 

    Share with a loved one to help spread this information and talk to your healthcare provider about your own cancer risks.

  5. Come Out for Health: National LGBT Health Awareness Week 2013 →

  6. Sadie, 11-Year-Old Transgender Girl, Writes Essay In Response To Obama’s Inauguration Speech
We are especially moved by this paragraph: 

When they grow up, transgender adults have a hard time getting a job because the boss thinks the customers will be scared away. Doctors are afraid of treating transgender patients because they don’t know how to take care of them, and some doctors don’t really want to help them. Transgender patients like me travel to other states to see a good doctor.

    Sadie, 11-Year-Old Transgender Girl, Writes Essay In Response To Obama’s Inauguration Speech

    We are especially moved by this paragraph: 

    When they grow up, transgender adults have a hard time getting a job because the boss thinks the customers will be scared away. Doctors are afraid of treating transgender patients because they don’t know how to take care of them, and some doctors don’t really want to help them. Transgender patients like me travel to other states to see a good doctor.

  7. The Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center, a program of Fenway Health, is starting a new short-term group for trans* identified people ages 18–28. →

    The group will be facilitated by a licensed transgender-identified clinician, aimed at transidentified people ages 18-28 who are exploring the intersection occurring between their gender identity/expression and their sexuality/sexual identity.

    This may include:

    • The complexities of navigating sexuality
    • Potential shifts in sexual attraction
    • Sexual identities
    • Relationships
    • Sex
    • Dating
    • Disclosure
    • Cultural shifts/shock (losing one community and gaining another) as a member of the trans community

    *used as an umbrella term

  8. Year in Review: 5 Advances in LGBT Health in 2012. 

    Year in Review: 5 Advances in LGBT Health in 2012. 

  9. Transgender Day Of Remembrance: Remembering Those Lost To Bigotry →

    Sobering statistics from the 2011 Hate Violence Report [PDF]

    Anti-LGBT murders increased 11% from 2010 to 2011—from 27 to 30 murders. 40% of those murdered were transgender women. Individuals who are transgender people of color were 28% likelier to experience violence than those who aren’t. 

  10. Boston observed the Transgender Day of Remembrance yesterday. Tomorrow, communities will gather again to remember those lost to anti-trans violence and discrimination.
glaad:

The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her memory of Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.
Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year. See the TDOR website at www.transgenderdor.org.
Resources for media/bloggers
 Check out GLAAD’s Media Reference Guide
Check out GLAAD’s resource kit for journalists covering Transgender Day of Remembrance
Check out GLAAD Blog posts about transgender issues
More information
 Learn more about transgender people at GLAAD’s resource page
Check out the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition’s Transgender Awareness Week
 Go to GLAAD’s Transgender Day of Remembrance page
Check out GLAAD Blog posts about transgender issues
Watch videos as part of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition’s Trans People Speak video series
Find out more about Transgender Day of Remembrance at  www.transgenderdor.org
See the list of people who died because of anti-transgender violence in 2012 

    Boston observed the Transgender Day of Remembrance yesterday. Tomorrow, communities will gather again to remember those lost to anti-trans violence and discrimination.

    glaad:

    The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her memory of Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.

    Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year. See the TDOR website at www.transgenderdor.org.

    Resources for media/bloggers

    More information