1. Sadie, 11-Year-Old Transgender Girl, Writes Essay In Response To Obama’s Inauguration Speech
We are especially moved by this paragraph: 

When they grow up, transgender adults have a hard time getting a job because the boss thinks the customers will be scared away. Doctors are afraid of treating transgender patients because they don’t know how to take care of them, and some doctors don’t really want to help them. Transgender patients like me travel to other states to see a good doctor.

    Sadie, 11-Year-Old Transgender Girl, Writes Essay In Response To Obama’s Inauguration Speech

    We are especially moved by this paragraph: 

    When they grow up, transgender adults have a hard time getting a job because the boss thinks the customers will be scared away. Doctors are afraid of treating transgender patients because they don’t know how to take care of them, and some doctors don’t really want to help them. Transgender patients like me travel to other states to see a good doctor.

  2. The Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center, a program of Fenway Health, is starting a new short-term group for trans* identified people ages 18–28. →

    The group will be facilitated by a licensed transgender-identified clinician, aimed at transidentified people ages 18-28 who are exploring the intersection occurring between their gender identity/expression and their sexuality/sexual identity.

    This may include:

    • The complexities of navigating sexuality
    • Potential shifts in sexual attraction
    • Sexual identities
    • Relationships
    • Sex
    • Dating
    • Disclosure
    • Cultural shifts/shock (losing one community and gaining another) as a member of the trans community

    *used as an umbrella term

  3. In honor of Transgender Awareness Week, our youth health center, The Borum, is highlighting some of the challenges faced by trans and gender nonconforming youth.
Though we still need more research to better reflect the diversity of trans youth’s experiences, what we know now clearly points to a need to do more to care for and empower them.
Learn more here.
Our thanks to GLSEN, the National Center for Transgender Equality, and all the other great organizations whose work contributed to the creation of this graphic. 
Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here.

    In honor of Transgender Awareness Week, our youth health center, The Borum, is highlighting some of the challenges faced by trans and gender nonconforming youth.

    Though we still need more research to better reflect the diversity of trans youth’s experiences, what we know now clearly points to a need to do more to care for and empower them.

    Learn more here.

    Our thanks to GLSEN, the National Center for Transgender Equality, and all the other great organizations whose work contributed to the creation of this graphic. 

    Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here.

  4. The transgender community faces a number of health disparities stemming from discrimination.

  5. This Transgender Awareness Week infographic explains some of the health disparities affecting the transgender community. Learn more here.
Our thanks to the National Center for Transgender Equality, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Center for American Progress, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition whose work contributed to the creation of this graphic. 
Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here.

    This Transgender Awareness Week infographic explains some of the health disparities affecting the transgender community. Learn more here.

    Our thanks to the National Center for Transgender Equality, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Center for American Progress, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition whose work contributed to the creation of this graphic. 

    Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here.

    (Source: fenwayhealth.org)

  6. Did you know 50% of transgender people surveyed reported having to teach their medical providers about transgender care?
Next week is Transgender Awareness Week, a series of statewide events and educational opportunities to inform people about the trans community and raise awareness of issues facing trans and gender noncomforming people in Massachusetts.
Fenway Health and The Borum will be participating by hosting events and by sharing information about the health disparities faced by trans people. 
Download/share a high-res PDF of this poster here.

    Did you know 50% of transgender people surveyed reported having to teach their medical providers about transgender care?

    Next week is Transgender Awareness Week, a series of statewide events and educational opportunities to inform people about the trans community and raise awareness of issues facing trans and gender noncomforming people in Massachusetts.

    Fenway Health and The Borum will be participating by hosting events and by sharing information about the health disparities faced by trans people. 

    Download/share a high-res PDF of this poster here.

  7. motherjones: 

Map: Transgender Employment Rights
MJ intern Gavin Aronsen reports:
A landmark survey of 6,450 trans and gender non-conforming people released in February by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force revealed some disturbing numbers:
Ninety percent of responders reported facing discrimination at work.
Unemployment rates were double the national average.
More than a quarter said they had been fired due to their gender identity.
Those who had lost their jobs were four times as likely to be homeless and 70 percent more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol.
And, perhaps most remarkably (and most related to Monday’s post), a full 41 percent of responders admitted to having attempted suicide.

Employment discrimination can also make it more difficult for trans* individuals to access health insurance and care, which can compound issues such as depression and substance use. 

    motherjones

    Map: Transgender Employment Rights

    MJ intern Gavin Aronsen reports:

    landmark survey of 6,450 trans and gender non-conforming people released in February by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force revealed some disturbing numbers:

    • Ninety percent of responders reported facing discrimination at work.
    • Unemployment rates were double the national average.
    • More than a quarter said they had been fired due to their gender identity.
    • Those who had lost their jobs were four times as likely to be homeless and 70 percent more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol.

    And, perhaps most remarkably (and most related to Monday’s post), a full 41 percent of responders admitted to having attempted suicide.

    Employment discrimination can also make it more difficult for trans* individuals to access health insurance and care, which can compound issues such as depression and substance use. 

  8. Trans* in the Healthcare System

    artoftransliness:

    As trans* people, we often find ourselves in the healthcare system in order to access testosterone or gender confirming surgeries. We also need doctors the way the rest of the population does, because we get sick just like everybody else. Even when we aren’t seeing the doctor for trans* related care, our trans* status can come up and complicate things. What if you’re otherwise stealth and experiencing uterine problems? What if you’re worried you might have diabetes but feel uncomfortable going to the doctor to find out? A lot of us have had negative experiences with the medical system that makes us uncomfortable accessing healthcare, and even if we haven’t we may worry about having a negative experience. Here are some tips: 

    1. Know your rights. If this seems like our #1 piece of advice with almost anything, that’s because it is incredibly important for a lot of different issues. It is illegal in the United States for a health care provider to turn down health care to a person because they are transgender. This doesn’t mean it can’t happen, but it does mean that the law is on your side in these types of situations. 

    2. If you can, find a doctor who is supportive and understanding of trans* people or at least someone that you feel comfortable with and who you can trust. A good doctor should not make you feel uncomfortable about your anatomy or treat you differently than a cis patient. You may want to find a doctor who has experience with trans* patients, even if you are not going to see them for trans* related care. A GP who has experience with trans* patients may be more knowledgeable about the effect hormones can have on your health and be on the lookout during your check-ups for potential issues. You also might just feel more comfortable with a doctor who is used to trans* bodies. Remember that your doctor is providing you with a service that you are paying for (even if insurance is covering your visit). You do not need to put up with a doctor who is treating you poorly or who makes you feel uncomfortable. You can look up reviews of doctors on sites like healthgrades.com or ask around for more trans* specific reviews and recommendations on sites like fuckyeahftms, fuckyeahmtfs, Laura’s Playground, etc. 

    3. Be honest about the medications you are on and about other information you share with your doctor. You never know when your hormones could affect or be the root of a medical issue you are having, particularly if it involves your liver. Your doctor just isn’t someone you want to lie to or keep things from because it keeps them from doing their best job keeping you healthy. This is another reason to try to find a doctor that you trust and who is understanding, because it is important to share things with them (even sensitive information as it relates to your health). Remember that your doctor is obligated to keep this information confidential. 

    4. On the flip side, recognize that there are certain questions that are NOT medically necessary for your doctor to know the answer to that you don’t have to answer if asked. It’s definitely your doctor’s business if you’ve had bottom surgery if they are recommending an exam of that area, but not if you’re at the podiatrist. Doctors should know better, but sometimes they ask rude questions. You DON’T have to answer questions like those, and should let your doctor know (if you feel alright doing so) that they are making you uncomfortable. 

    5. If you can, bring someone who is supportive with you to be your advocate. If you are going to a new doctor or going to the hospital, it can be a good idea to take someone with you who can help you make sure you are treated appropriately and given the best care possible. Medical situations can be incredibly stressful for some trans* people, and so it can also just be nice to have a calming and supporting presence with you. 

    Great advice! A lot of transgender patients report having to educate their providers. For more trans health resources, check out the left-hand column on our Trans Health Program page

  9. A More Inclusive Breast Cancer Awareness Month →

    October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and lots of great information is being shared; but one-size-fits-all messaging often excludes those in the LGBT community. Learn more about how breast cancer impacts lesbian and bisexual women and transgender people on both the masculine and feminine spectrums here.

    As we celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we should recognize that every person’s experience with breast cancer is unique, and can vary among communities. Sensitivity to culture, gender identity, and sexual orientation should be part of the conversation.